Forestry for the Future: A film introduces forestry to landowners with a 65-year study
Forests For Maine's Future

Forestry for the Future: A film introduces forestry to landowners with a 65-year study

By Maren Granstrom *Editor’s note: Forester Maren Granstrom voluntarily submitted this article to Forests for Maine’s Future and Maine TREE to highlight the “Forestry for the Future” video she produced as part of her Master’s of Science work at the University of Maine’s School of Forest Resources. Maine TREE claims no ownership of the video and…

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Trees and Winter…..

Warming temperatures, less snowfall  pose new challenges for northeastern species Winter can be a challenge. For people. And trees. It’s no surprise that the tropics and subtropics host a lot more types of trees. And that they grow bigger and faster than in the northern temperate zone. Twenty-five acres of Borneo rainforest can have more…

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Invasive Plants in Maine

There are a lot of threats to Maine forests — fragmentation, poor forestry practices, development, imported and native pests and diseases . . . and invasive plants. Plants like “burning bush,” famous for its red color. Or the distinctive “Crimson King” Norway maple. Or the common privet. Plants that have graced Maine lawns and gardens…

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Budworm Communications

It’s safe to say that things have changed since the 1970s and 1980s, when the spruce budworm last ravaged the northern Maine woods. The forest has changed hands, some parcels many times. The state’s woods products and paper industries have suffered severe blows — mills have closed and thousands of jobs evaporated. Then, there is…