Archive | Forests For Maine's Future

Deer yards: Shelter from the storm

It’s not easy being a whitetail deer in Maine in the winter, especially northern Maine. The snow piles deep, the frozen winds howl down out of Canada and food is scarce, especially foods that provide the necessary calories to help you cope with the harsh weather. Enter the deer wintering area. Or “deer yard” as…

Archive | Forests For Maine's Future

Forest Management in the big city

A thinned white pine stand photo courtesy of City of PortlandTwo years ago, logging crews spent the first three months thinning the woods surrounding Riverside Golf Course along the Presumpscot River. Not unusual, this is Maine, after all, the most forested state in the country. But it is noteworthy because it occurred in Maine’s largest…

Archive | Forests For Maine's Future

CLT: The Great Wood Hope

People have been gluing up wood for thousands of years. Prehistoric peoples bonded spear points and ax heads to wood with glue. The ancient Egyptians 5,500 years ago figured out how to make veneer.  Plywood is old hat: invented the year the American Civil War ended. After World War II chemists and engineers figured out…

Archive | Forests For Maine's Future

Maine Wood Manufacturers are still an Important Part of the Economy

They produce gun stocks, flooring, cedar shingles, log homes, wooden playsets. They make cigar tips, wooden pack baskets, doors and staircases. Cutting boards and chairs, cabinets and baseball bats, grilling planks canoe paddles. Colorful wooden eggs made by Wells Wood Turning in Buckfield have been featured at the White House Easter Egg roll since 2006,…