Holt Research Forest Strategic Research and Management Plan
Holt Research Forest | Updates

Holt Research Forest Strategic Research and Management Plan

The HRF is the crown jewel of the ‘R’ in the Maine Timber Research & Environmental Education (TREE) Foundation.  Maine TREE acquired the 350-acre property, including buildings, in 2014 through a merger with the Holt Woodland Research Foundation with research conducted through a contract with the University of Maine. This 350-acre property in Arrowsic, Maine…

Mt. Ararat Students Use Maine TREE Protocols to Analyze Forest Growth
Forest Ecology Research Network | Project Learning Tree

Mt. Ararat Students Use Maine TREE Protocols to Analyze Forest Growth

Photo Courtesy of Kevin Doran This fall, students of Mr. Glenn Evans’ sophomore Honors Biology class at Mt. Ararat High School in Topsham, Maine conducted an analysis of forest growth using community science protocols established by Maine TREE. Mr. Evans and his students are long-time contributors to what is now known as the Forest Ecology…

WEBINAR: Holt Research Forest Pre-Harvest Information Session
Holt Research Forest

WEBINAR: Holt Research Forest Pre-Harvest Information Session

On Thursday, September 24th, Maine TREE hosted an informational webinar is to share information about an upcoming research timber harvest at the Holt Research Forest in Arrowsic. Jack Witham, Holt Research Forest Scientist, provides background on the history of the Holt Research Forest, and Maine Licensed Forester, Barrie Brusila, gives an overview of the planned…

Archive | Forests For Maine's Future

Pinning down Maine’s future forest

By Joe RankinForests for Maine’s Future writer Forests aren’t static. They’re dynamic. Since trees colonized the rubble left by the glaciers’ retreat 12,000 years ago, the forest has shifted and reshaped itself many times. Jim Shaffer examines a pineNow the planet is heating up and scientists are trying to anticipate how things will change. Some…

Archive | Forests For Maine's Future

Ferns: Beauty and Grace in the Understory

 “Outdoors” people, even those that don’t consider themselves naturalists, can identify trees, at the least common species. And the common wildflowers. But, when it comes to ferns, well, ferns tend to look alike. Sort of lacy and delicate and  . . . green. That is unfortunate, say fern lovers and fern experts. Ferns are a…

Archive | Forests For Maine's Future

Old-Growth Forests: Back to the Future?

There’s no question that old growth forests are fairly uncommon, especially in the eastern parts of North America. In a handful of generations European settlers turned tens of millions of acres of old trees into beams and boards and a thousand other things and the land that had grown them to corn and potatoes and…

Archive | Forests For Maine's Future

Forest Management in the big city

A thinned white pine stand photo courtesy of City of PortlandTwo years ago, logging crews spent the first three months thinning the woods surrounding Riverside Golf Course along the Presumpscot River. Not unusual, this is Maine, after all, the most forested state in the country. But it is noteworthy because it occurred in Maine’s largest…