WEBINAR: Holt Research Forest Pre-Harvest Information Session
Holt Research Forest

WEBINAR: Holt Research Forest Pre-Harvest Information Session

On Thursday, September 24th, Maine TREE hosted an informational webinar is to share information about an upcoming research timber harvest at the Holt Research Forest in Arrowsic. Jack Witham, Holt Research Forest Scientist, provides background on the history of the Holt Research Forest, and Maine Licensed Forester, Barrie Brusila, gives an overview of the planned…

Archive | Forests For Maine's Future

Pinning down Maine’s future forest

By Joe RankinForests for Maine’s Future writer Forests aren’t static. They’re dynamic. Since trees colonized the rubble left by the glaciers’ retreat 12,000 years ago, the forest has shifted and reshaped itself many times. Jim Shaffer examines a pineNow the planet is heating up and scientists are trying to anticipate how things will change. Some…

Archive | Forests For Maine's Future

Deer yards: Shelter from the storm

It’s not easy being a whitetail deer in Maine in the winter, especially northern Maine. The snow piles deep, the frozen winds howl down out of Canada and food is scarce, especially foods that provide the necessary calories to help you cope with the harsh weather. Enter the deer wintering area. Or “deer yard” as…

Archive | Forests For Maine's Future

Whatever Happened to Acid Rain?

Human-caused climate change is THE environmental issue of our times. Alarming reports point out that we’re already seeing the effects of a warming planet and predict dire consequences if we don’t get a handle on our fossil fuel addiction — and soon. But before climate change, there was acid rain. Back in the 1980s and…

Archive | Forests For Maine's Future

Forest Management in the big city

A thinned white pine stand photo courtesy of City of PortlandTwo years ago, logging crews spent the first three months thinning the woods surrounding Riverside Golf Course along the Presumpscot River. Not unusual, this is Maine, after all, the most forested state in the country. But it is noteworthy because it occurred in Maine’s largest…

Archive | Forests For Maine's Future

Invasive Plants in Maine

There are a lot of threats to Maine forests — fragmentation, poor forestry practices, development, imported and native pests and diseases . . . and invasive plants. Plants like “burning bush,” famous for its red color. Or the distinctive “Crimson King” Norway maple. Or the common privet. Plants that have graced Maine lawns and gardens…